What have your results with Rock Dust been like?

Success? Failure? Question? Comments?

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Hi Rocky,

I'm sorry, I can't really give you good information about cat litter or even bentonite. We recommend utilizing hard-silicon rock dust. Please download the RTE primer. 

Best,

Orlando at RTE

Most of the gardeners I know are partial towards the microfine grit, it is just more readily available to your plants.  The brix blend that you described will just take a little longer to become available to the plant.   It might be a great amendment for a clay soil since it is more sandy consistency. 

Brixblend

Microfine Blend 



Rocky said:

My.rock.dust.is.not.100%.powder.

It.has.many.pieces,of.different.sizes.some.about.5mm.wide.

Is.that.too.big?

The.manufacturer.says.that.pieces.of.rock.dust.is.good.for.long.term.fertilizing.

Hello all,

I am working on setting up a buying cooperative in the Charlottesville, Virginia area to purchase and distribute a whole truckload of Tom Vanacore's "Luckyrock". I would like some help however, determining ideal application rates, even approximately. I have been using Logan Labs for my soil analyses ( Soil Test) and Vanacore has his minerals analyzed with Actlabs. (LuckyRockDust).

Can anyone advise me on the mathematics here to help approximate application levels in lbs/sq-ft? What should I be looking to match?

Thank you,

Connor Campbell

American Safety and Health Promotions Unlimited

www.americansafetyandsmokemaker.com

Does this help?:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czARbiHAUB4

Connor Douglas Campbell said:

Hello all,

I am working on setting up a buying cooperative in the Charlottesville, Virginia area to purchase and distribute a whole truckload of Tom Vanacore's "Luckyrock". I would like some help however, determining ideal application rates, even approximately. I have been using Logan Labs for my soil analyses ( Soil Test) and Vanacore has his minerals analyzed with Actlabs. (LuckyRockDust).

Can anyone advise me on the mathematics here to help approximate application levels in lbs/sq-ft? What should I be looking to match?

Thank you,

Connor Campbell

American Safety and Health Promotions Unlimited

www.americansafetyandsmokemaker.com

Hi Connor,

I'm not familiar with this particular product from Tom Vanacore,  but he is very accessible so I would suggest contacting him for your specific situation and asking him. He has Has a background as a farmer, and I'm sure that he'll be of help to you. 

As far as the YouTube goes that was suggested by Rocky, I have spent decades collecting research and following what's going on in the world as far as the movement of remineralization,  so his point of view is not very persuasive.

Please feel welcome to email me if you need an introduction if you need an introduction to Tom.

 Joanna Campe
Executive Director
Remineralize the Earth
152 South Street
Northampton, MA 01060 USA 
Tel: 413-563-9938
Book
Geotherapy: Innovative Methods of Soil Fertility Restoration, Carbon Sequestration, and Reversing CO2 Increase
 
Please join and support us on Patreon

Book: 'GEOTHERAPY', by Thomas J. Goreau, Ronal W. Larson, Joanna Campe

Biochar & dusts.

Compost & dusts:

https://youtu.be/xh3749rxFCw?t=605

Book
Geotherapy: Innovative Methods of Soil Fertility Restoration, Carbon Sequestration, and Reversing CO2 Increase

https://www.crcpress.com/Geotherapy-Innovative-Methods-of-Soil-Fert...

Just joined the community, wanted to jump into some of these topics...

I am working on a large-scale reclamation project in California to convert volcanic cinders into agricultural inputs. I am aware of all the volcanic cinder companies that are currently in the market (Azomite, Cinderite, Canamaze, etc.) but have struggled with the general absence of transparency regarding product specifications and functionality.

My research has focused on precision grinding of the volcanic cinders to produce a very fine gradation (between 50 to 10 microns) which optimizes for surface area. It is my understanding the surface area is one of the key factors in micro-organism interactions which is required to convert the inorganic minerals into soluble elements that plants can then utilize.

I have seen very little information presented on this aspect of volcanic rock dust and am curious to know people's experience using coarse- vs. fine-grained volcanic rock dust. My intention is to optimize the grinding environment to produce a highly-uniform, better-performing volcanic rock dust that increases the rate of micro-organism productivity in the soil.

I will be producing bulk samples during the month of October and obtaining soil input analysis certificates to confirm composition and solubility levels. Would be happy to send out samples to the Remineralize community if there is an interest in evaluating an ultra-fine product. 

Looking forward to becoming more active within the Remineralize community! Thanks!

Scott, I think as far as transparency and information is concerned, I think you can find out the most by contacting Tom Vanacore through his website Rock Dust Local. He does create products which combine different finenesses from coarse to finer. I'd be happy to receive some samples.

Scott Bramwell said:

Just joined the community, wanted to jump into some of these topics...

I am working on a large-scale reclamation project in California to convert volcanic cinders into agricultural inputs. I am aware of all the volcanic cinder companies that are currently in the market (Azomite, Cinderite, Canamaze, etc.) but have struggled with the general absence of transparency regarding product specifications and functionality.

My research has focused on precision grinding of the volcanic cinders to produce a very fine gradation (between 50 to 10 microns) which optimizes for surface area. It is my understanding the surface area is one of the key factors in micro-organism interactions which is required to convert the inorganic minerals into soluble elements that plants can then utilize.

I have seen very little information presented on this aspect of volcanic rock dust and am curious to know people's experience using coarse- vs. fine-grained volcanic rock dust. My intention is to optimize the grinding environment to produce a highly-uniform, better-performing volcanic rock dust that increases the rate of micro-organism productivity in the soil.

I will be producing bulk samples during the month of October and obtaining soil input analysis certificates to confirm composition and solubility levels. Would be happy to send out samples to the Remineralize community if there is an interest in evaluating an ultra-fine product. 

Looking forward to becoming more active within the Remineralize community! Thanks!

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